Posted by: Gregory Linton | 09/21/2010

Benefits of Higher Education

In previous posts about the gender gap in higher education, I noted the socioeconomic benefits of a college education in order to make the case that having larger numbers of female college graduates than male graduate results in dire societal consequences. The evidence continues to mount that a college graduate has advantages in the marketplace over the non-graduate. Two recent news articles have described these consequences.

Dougherty, C. (2010, September 20). College grads expand lead in job security. The Wall Street Journal. This article compares the outcome of a woman with a college degree and a man who did not go to college. The woman recently received a pay raise while the man was laid off and forced to take a much lower-paying job. The main point of the article is that the recession has only widened the divide between the college graduate and the non-graduate. One statistic in the article is that people with four-year college degrees make 64% more than those with only high-school degrees.

Supiano, B. (2010, September 21). Education pays, but how much? The Chronicle of Higher Education. This article summarizes the recent report by the College Board entitled “Education Pays.” This report shows that not only do college graduates make 66% more than non-graduates, but they are also less likely to be unemployed. This article does a nice job of including opposing viewpoints that are skeptical of the data in the report.

If these statistics are true, then the negative consequences of not getting a college degree apply in much greater numbers to the male population than the female population, since women are going to college in much greater numbers. Men who earn low wages or are unemployed are more likely to be involved in crime, drug use, and other behaviors that have personal and societal repercussions.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories